Composing posts in less time, one sitting- how?

Hi all,

I’m finding that it’s taking too long to put a post together, which is resulting in having to break away in the middle. When I get back to it, I’ve lost the (whatever you call it, inspiration?) for the idea. 

Wondering how you all “practice” blogging so that the post actually gets (researched, outlined, written)?

Thanks

#blogging, #creative-writing, #inspiration, #writing

How to pick the right religion

Which religion is right for you?
https://stevensawyer.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/how-to-pick-the-right-religion/
#dailydiscussions #religion #feedback #writing #christianity #traditional #likefollowshare #family #culture #happiness #blogging #bloggingmeetup #bloggersmeetup

How to write better.

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#authors, #blog-posts, #blogging, #diary, #faulkner, #hemingway, #journal, #love-stories, #nonfiction, #notebook, #novels, #passion, #personal-notes, #quotes, #short-stories, #vocabulary, #wordpress, #words, #writing

5 writing rules from C.S. Lewis

It’s great to return to the BMU.  I have missed reading y’alls stuff and posting mine.

Hope you like the post today. These rules are tried and true for any writer who wants to write better.  Enjoy . . .

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#c-s-lewis, #help, #learn-to-write-better, #publishing, #the-joy-of-writing, #writing, #writing-rules

Love writing on the BMU

The BMU (Blogging Meetup) has always offered a venue for all kinds of writing on all kinds of topics. You can find amateur, beginning writers as well as published professional writers. Because we have so many interests, it’s easy for any writer to search and discover fellow writers of the same ilk with the same interests.

An interesting genre for me is the diary/journal crowd.  They write, they say, mostly for themselves. They just like to sit at the keyboard and have fun just getting their thoughts down on paper. For those not-so-serious writers it’s always fun to see something they’ve written published.

I’ve run across a few writers who have been liberated from an agonizing, some times violent past. The BMU offers the space and the grace to chronicle, many times for the first time, their journey. It’s a blessing to me to read their successes, and the new freedom they must feel. Their stories are often heartbreaking and agonizing to read. But those heartbreaks make their successes that much sweeter. Just writing down their experiences and their pain exemplifies uncommon courage.

The BMU often attracts new writers who have heard from friends, “You should write a book.” Those newbies come to the BMU to test the waters, get some writing experience and seek some advice from other writers.

Encouraging other writers blesses me.  I think we all should support as many writers as we read here. You will never know how something you say might encourage or impact another writer. Those of us who’ve been writing for years learned early on how precious positive feedback becomes.  Positive feedback motivates us all. We could all use more “likes” and “comments” on our posts. And the BMU is the perfect place to hand out more at-a-boys

#creative-writing, #diary, #encouragement, #journals, #newbies, #professional-writers, #writers, #writing

Do you enjoy prose and poetry?

Hi peeps,

Who among you likes prose and poetry? Whether you just enjoy reading or you’re a word twister yourself… Here is my latest entry, a very personal poem on what it seems humanity can’t get enough of… love and heartbreak.

Any feedback is welcomed and appreciated. Have a nice day, xx

 

#poetry, #writer, #writing

7 helpful questions for blog post writers

“Read, read, read. Read everything — trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it.
Then write. If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out of the window.” William Faulkner

Before you hit Publish, are you satisfied with your post?

Don’t many of us write extemporaneous posts? Sometimes I simply sit down at the keyboard and plunk away at a thought or a prompt from reading other posts. When I read the published version, I often regret putting it out there. I often discover flagrant faux pas or glaring grammar goofs. Cringing at my carelessness, I sometimes resort to editing it and re-publishing. (Keep in mind, I’m a former reporter and editor and got paid to write. My stuff had to be good. Old habits, you know.)

Are you ever dissatisfied with a post you’re about to share with the world? Try asking yourself these 7 questions I ask myself when I proofread my posts. You might want to consider them to improve your posts.

  1. Is your heading too long?
    A reasonable length is 6 to 8 words. As we’ve said before in this space, many readers don’t read past your heading. If you don’t entice them with those 6-8 words, you might lose them before they get to your opening sentence.
  2. Did you proofread your text?
    That’s a cardinal rule for me. It ought to be for all of you as well. My dingbat blogging buddy, Suze, will disagree. She spends most of her time at the home staring into space and playing bingo when she’s not blogging.
  3. Did you put yourself in my readers’ place?
    What will your audience gain from reading your post?  Who are you writing for? Yourself or your readers?
  4. Did you use “you” often? Writing for that second person pronoun, draws readers in and helps them think you’re writing to them.
  5. Can you use “how to’s” or lists or  numbers.
    Readers love lists. Use them if you can.
  6. Did you ask for feedback?
    Do you want to know what your readers thought about your post? They’ll think you’re really interested in their opinions and comments.  People love to connect with other people. I often use the hashtag #feedback when I post on the BMU.  And I sometimes ask readers directly, “What do you think?” Or, “I’d like to get your feedback on this topic (idea, post).”
  7. Is your purpose for writing clear?
    Will your readers “get it”?   Will they perceive your intent for writing your post? Do you get it yourself?

Well, there they are. Seven questions I ask (and answer) myself so I’ll be satisfied with my post once it’s published. Hope you’ll try these out yourself. You may be pleasantly surprised how your writing may improve when you ask and answer them.

Do you have questions you ask yourself while you’re writing to make it better? I’d love to hear from you. How do your questions help you improve your posts.

I

 

#blog-posts, #blogging, #headings, #helpful, #inspiration, #questions, #style, #word, #writing